Lionel Toy Trains





The page shows vintage Lionel trains and accessories that I have. My original Lionel Santa Fe outfit was purchased new in 1952. In the 1960's, I added other Lionel train cars and accessories to my train layout. The front cover of the Lionel 1952 Consumer Catalog that lists my Lionel train outfit is shown below.


1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

On this page, I will describe the Lionel trains and associated accessories I have and show the pages from this 1952 Lionel catalog that describes the items.

Santa Fe F3 Diesel (1950 - 1952)

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No. 2343P Santa Fe Locomotive

Shown above is a Lionel Santa Fe diesel locomotive. The locomotive is a #2343P (powered) "A" unit and is part of an F3 freight outfit. This locomotive has dual electric motors, magnetic wheels to improve traction (Lionel called it "Magnetraction"), and a horn that runs on a 1.5V D-cell battery.

This locomotive and the train outfit described below is over 50 years old. This train was given to me as a Christmas present around 1959. Prior to my ownership, this train set belonged to my cousin.

Below is a picture of me on Christmas Day playing with this train.



The photograph has been annotated to identify some of the train items in the picture. These items are described below. I had an elaborate setup on three 4 x 8 ft tables with two villages at either end and mountains and tunnels for the train to pass over and through.

The picture below shows the locomotive on a short track ready to go.

No. 2343T, No. 2343C, & 2343P Santa Fe Locomotives

The powered Santa Fe locomotive has an associated "dummy" Santa Fe "A" unit locomotive (#2343T) that externally looks identical to the powered locomotive (both manufactured in 1950-1952). This combination is known as an "AA" unit. Between the two locomotives, there is an unmanned "dummy" engine #2343C "B" unit (manufactured in 1950-1955). A actual train would be configured this way if it were pulling a long line of freight cars. Also shown in the picture above is a caboose. Note that the two locomotives and the caboose are illuminated.

In the picture above, you can see the original box in which the #2343T "dummy" locomotive came in. I also have the original box for the #2343C "B" unit locomotive. Also shown is one two transformers I have to power the train set.

This train set is an "O" gauge train set. The train set has 3 rails. The two outer rails are electrically connected through the ties. The center rail is electrically isolated from the other two rails. The electrical connection to the rails is made through the train wheels and a set of rollers that roll on the center rail. The train is powered by alternating current with a maximum rms voltage of about 20 volts.

I have cleaned and oiled up the powered locomotive and it now runs well both forward and reverse. The original horn inside the locomotive was defective and I designed a solid-state replacement that uses a 9-volt battery instead of a 1.5-volt battery. The 9-volt battery easily fits inside the 1.5-volt compartment accessed on the underside of the locomotive.

The locomotive is well designed and the detail and effort in developing this locomotive is described on page 26 of the 1952 Lionel catalog. This page is shown below.

Page 26 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog


Lionel #2191W Outfit (1952)



I believe the three Santa Fe engines I have were purchased as part of a Lionel Outfit #2191W that was released in 1952. This outfit is described on pages 18 and 19 in the 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog, shown below.

No. 2181W Santa Fe Outfit on Pages 18-19 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog


The #2191W Outfit was a 4-car diesel freight set that included the following components, all of which I have:

2343 A-A Santa Fe diesels (2343P and 2343T)
2343C B Unit (2343C)
6462 New York Central gondola car
6656 stock car
6456 Lehigh Valley hopper car
6457 SP-style caboose

The 1952 list price for the #2191W Santa Fe outfit was $70.

Below is a pictue of my Lionel No. 2191W outfit.

No. 2191W Santa Fe Outfit


When the #2191W outfit was originally purchased, I believe the folowing additional Lionel items were also purchased:
#3461 Automatic Lumber Car
#3469 Automatic Dumping Ore Car
#3520 Operating Searchlight Car
#3472 Milk Car with Milk Platform
#145 Gateman
#256 Freight Station


Freight Cars


Below are pictures of the freight cars that I have.


No. 6357 and No. 6457 Cabooses

The picture above shows two cabooses I had from long ago. The one on the left is a #6357 (1948-1961). The one on the right is a #6457 (1949-1952) for which I have the original box.

The 6357 caboose is fairly common and due to its long 14-year production run, it has undergone numerous variations.

The #6457 caboose was Lionel's premium SP-style caboose and is fairly easy to obtain. This caboose was included with Lionel's better train sets and included with my #2191W Outfit.

You could purchase the #6457 caboose separately in 1952 for $5 as shown on page 29 of the 1952 catalog. See below:

No. 6457 Caboose on Page 29 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

I have a Lionel No. 6427-1 Lionel Lines N5c porthole caboose (manufactured from 1954-1960. This caboose is Tuscan painted with white heat-stamped lettering including the number "64273." As you can see, the caboose is illuminated and has bar-end trucks and one coupler. Note that I have the original box for this caboose.

No. 6427-1 Caboose


No. 3461 Automatic Lumber Car & No. 3469 Automatic Dumping Ore Car

The picture above shows 2 automatic dumping cars I have. As shown, I have the original boxes for both of these cars. The car on the left is a #3461 automatic lumber car (manufactured between 1949-55) and the one on the right is a #3469 automatic dumping ore car (manufactured between 1949-55). I have 3 logs for the log car and a Lionel #207 bag of artificial coal for the ore car. I have one Model #160 plastic bin that sits by the track to catch the contents of the cars. The cars can dump their contents only when they are on the #UCS remote-controlled (by wire) decoupling and unloading track section.

These cars were listed on page 28 of the 1952 catalog as shown below. Shown on the top left is the #UCS remote control track section. Also shown on this catalog page is the #3520 Operating Searchlight Car I have.

Nos. 3461, 3469, and 3520 Cars, and UCS Track Section on Page 28 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog
No. 6462 Gondola Car & No. 6456 Hopper Car

The picture above shows a #6462 New York Central gondola car and a #6456 hopper car with the original boxes. I have wood barrels that go in the gondola car which was included with my 2191W Outfit.

The #6456 Lehigh Valley hopper car was also included with my 2191W Outfit. The #6462 NYC Gondola Car as listed on page 29 of the 1952 catalog along with the #6656 Stock Car I have as shown below.

No. 6462 Gondola Car & No. 6656 Stock Car on Page 29 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

The #6456 Lehigh Valley Hopper Car was also listed on page 29 of the 1952 catalog as shown below.

No. 6456 Hopper Car on Page 29 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

No. 6462-25 Gondola Car

I also have a green gondola car (shown above). It is a Lionel No. 6462-25 (manufacturered 1954-1957) although the -25 number shows nowhere on the car. The "N" of the NYC logo is stamped in the second panel from the left on my car indicating the car was manufactured early in the production run. I have the original box for this car, although the box is quite worn. The car is is reasonably good shape with only one or two wheels a bit rusty.

No. 6462 Red Gondola Car with Canisters

I also have a red gondola car (shown above). It is a Lionel No. 6462 (manufactured 1954-1957). The car is painted red and the "N" of the NYC logo is stamped in the third panel from the left on my car. The car is also stamped "NWE 2-49". These things indicate that this car was one of the later ones produced. I received this car with the load of four red cansiters stamped with "Lionel Air Activated Container" on them. It is my understanding that this load is normally associated with the Lionel 6562 gondola. However, when I received this car, there was a significant amount of dust on the canisters and car and when I removed the cansiters, there was no dust under them. All this indicates to me that the canisters have been associated with my 6462 red gondola for a long time. Furhermore, the Lionel repair manual does associated the 6462 red gondola with a canister load like I have. So I believe these canisters came with this car.


No. 3520 Operating Searchlight Car and No. 6555 Tank Car

The picture above shows a #3520 operating search light car (1952-1953) with its original box and a rusty #6555 tank car (1949). The searchlight lights up and rotates. Note the SUNOCO name on the tank car.

The searchlight car is typically a reliable car and is still in demand by collectors and operators. On my searchlight car, the metal bracket holding the plastic searchlight lens is chemically blackened and has 8 holes. I understand this version is rare. The searchlight has a vibrating motor that makes the lens rotate. Below are two pictures of the searchlight car in operation.

No. 3520 Operating Searchlight Car in Operation

As noted above, the #3520 Operating Searchlight Car was listed on page 28 of the 1952 catalog.

The #6555 tank car was the last of the pre-WWII style tank car produced by Lionel. The all-metal construction of this car is still remains a favorite of collectors and operators. After 1950, the tank cars manufactured by Lionel are made of plastic. The tank car has the words "gas" and "oil" above and below the SUNOCO name indicating the car was manufactured in 1949.
No. 3650 Searchlight Extension Car

The picture above shows a Lionel #3650 Searchlight Extension Car (manufactured from 1956 - 1959). This car is a metal car with a depressed center frame with a molded generator placed on one of the step decks of the car. On the other step deck, the searchlight is mounted on a red base with a magnet unnderneath to secure it to the deck. A red cable reel stucture is mounted on the depressed area onto which a 2-conductor green cable is wound. This cable applies power to the searchlight as picked up from the track. A die cast reel handle used to wind the cable on the reel is placed next to the reel. The searchlight can be removed from the car and positioned anywhere where the cable will allow. The searchlight itself is quite similar to the one on the #3520 car I have. The # 3650 searchlight does not rotate. My #3650 searchlight car is painted light gray - another variant is painted dark gray. Note I have the origianl box for this car.


No. 6415 Tank Car and No 6656 Stock Car

The picture above shows a #6415 tank car (1953-1955) and a #6656 stock car (1950-1953) with their original boxes. Note the old SUNOCO name on the tank car.

The tank car is one of only two-triple dome tank cars produced by Lionel after WWII. This car is not particularly rare. Note that this car has the three filler caps in tact. The caps are fragile and often broken.

The #6656 stock car was introduced in 1950 and was manufactured for 4 years. It is good representation of actual stock cars of the 1950's and was included with my 2191W Outfit. As noted above, the #6656 Stock Car was listed on page 29 of the 1952 catalog.


Lionel No. 6425 Gulf Tank Car

I also have a Lionel #6425 3-dome Gulf tank car (manufactured 1956-1958). This car is essentially identical to my 3-dome #6415 Sunoco tank car shown above with the primary difference being the Gulf logo instead of the Sunoco logo.


Lionel No. 6464-475 Boston and Maine Boxcar

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 6464-475 Boston and Maine boxcar (manufactured from 1957-1960). The boxcar has a blue body with an unpainted black door. This car has bar-end trucks with tab magnetic couplers.
Lionel No. 6464-500 Timken Boxcar

The picture above shows a #6464-500 Timken boxcar (manufactured from 1957-1959). The boxcar had a missing door on the side shown when I received it long ago. I purchased a replacement door along with the lower door guide and painted the door to match the original colors. You can see the result in the photo. The yellow was the most difficult to match and I found that Model Master "Insignia Yellow" (#FS33538) paint for plastic models was the perfect match.

The good graphics with bright yellow exterior and realistic markings on the Timken boxcar make this sought after by collectors and operators. This boxcar is apparently somewhat rare. As with mine, the yellow and white colors are prone to attracting dirt and smudges but the graphics on mine are still reasonably sharp.

No. 6430 Cooper-Jarrett Van Car

The picture above shows a #6430 Cooper-Jarrett van car (manufactured from 1956-1958). When I received the car years ago, the two vans were missing. I was able to obtain the two vans; however, the tops of the vans are replacements and are white rather than gray that is the color of the sides of the vans. The Cooper-Jarrett logos on the sides of the vans are stainless steel with a copper-colored arrow and black lettering. The arrow always points forward so the logo plates are not interchangeable from side to side. The vans have dual wheels on the rear and single wheels on the front. I understand Lionel made several dual-van flat cars, but the Cooper Jarrett ones are the most desirable.


No. 6342 Culvert Hauling Car & No. 342 Culvert Loader

The picture above shows a 6342 culvert hauling car with the attendant model 342 culvert loader (manufactured from 1957-1959) containing the sign "Lionelville Culvert Pipe Company." The loader has an overhead crane that transfers the culverts from the "building" to the car. You can see one culvert being held by the crane. The crane is powered by an electric vibrator motor and can be controlled remotely. The roof of the culvert company is broken and the broken piece is missing. The culverts are metal.


No. 6560 "Bucyrus Erie" Crane Car and No. 6419 D. L&W Wrecking Car

The picture above shows a #6560 "Bucyrus Erie" crane railroad car (manufactured from 1955-1969) and a #6419 D. L&W wrecking car caboose (manufactured from 1948-1950 and 1952-1955).

On the #6560 crane car, the crane arm moves up and down by a handwheel on the rear of the crane cabin. The crane hook also moves up and down by a handwheel on the side of the crane cabin. My car has a molded plastic frame, molded red cab, an open-spoked hand crank on the side shown (the crank on the rear does not have open spokes), and bar-end trucks suggesting it is an early version of the car.

The #6419 Wrecking car is in like-new shape and note that I have the original box with its liner to support the car although the box is not in good shape. I even have the Lionel inspection slip shown sitting on the top of the box. The initials on the car stand for Delaware, Lackawanna, and Western railroad. The car has a metal die cast frame, two molded plastic tool boxes, and a molded plastic cab, all painted light gray. A tall black die cast smokestack is mounted on the cab and a brake wheel and vertical post assembly on each end. Wire handrails are included on both ends, also. My car has bar end trucks with couplers on both ends indicating it is the later vintage and manufactured between 1952 and 1955.

These two railroad cars are often seen in tandem as shown in the picture when being pulled in a line of railroad cars. With the cab of the caboose being toward the rear of the car and the tool boxes in the front, that layout provides a natural space for the arm of the crane.



Lionel No. 3359 Twin Bin Operating Dump Car

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 3359 Twin Bin Operating Dump car (manufactured from 1955-1958). The two bins are made of unpainted gray plastic with black heat-stamped lettering. The bins tilt to dump the cargo in sequence. To operate (dump) the cargo, one pulses the "uncouple" control of a Lionel uncouple/unload track section and a cam device under the car steps through its sequence and tilts one bin in small increments and then tilts the other bin in a similar sequence. Note that I have the original box for this car and the price when purchased was $5.97.



Lionel No. 3361 Operating Log Dump Car

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 3361 Operating Log Dump Car (manufactured from 1955-1959). The car has a separate molded plastic dump frame mounted on the center of the plastic body. The frame is raised incrementally by pulsing the "uncouple" control of a Lionel uncouple/unload track section. This action causes the stained wooden dowel logs to eventually roll off. My car is the later version as it has sans-serif lettering. I have four dowel logs that came with this car.



No. 6461 Transformer Car

The picure above shows a #6461 Transformer Car (manufactured from 1949-1950). This is a nicely detailed depressed center flat car. The diecast metal frame is painted medium gray with rubber-stamped lettering in black. A simulated transformer load is mounted on the depressed center of the car. The transformer has a decal at the top on only one side that says "transformer car." The car has blued steel steps and blackened steel brakestands. The car has staple-end trucks with magnetic couplers. I believe my car has the original transformer white insulators - these are easily broken.



No. 6561 Cable Car

The picure above shows a #6561 Cable Car (manufactured from 1953-1956). This car has the original cable reels with the aluminum wire wound around the reel. It also has the elastic band that runs across the two reels and is attached to the flatcar in two places. This car features a gray painted metal depressed center flatcar with black lettering, bar-end trucks with operating couplers, metal footsteps at each corner, and a brakestand and brakewheel at each end. My car has the more common orange reels. Note that I also have the original box for this car.


No. 6561 Cable Car

No. 6561 Cable Car with Gray Reels

The picure above shows a #6561 Cable Car (manufactured from 1953-1956) but with the relatively rare gray reels. This car has the original cable reels with the aluminum wire wound around the reel. It also has the elastic band that runs across the two reels and is attached to the flatcar in two places. This car features a gray painted metal depressed center flatcar with black lettering, bar-end trucks with operating couplers, metal footsteps at each corner, and a brakestand and brakewheel at each end. Note that I also have the original box for this car.


No. 3530 Operating Generator Car

The picture above shows a #3530 Operating Generator Car (manufactured from 1956-1958). The car is a replica of a General Motors Electro Motive Division generator car. It is made of blue plastic with a white stripe painted on its side. Mine has the stripe going through the ladder at the end - other versions have the stripe ending at the ladder. The car has double sliding doors on each side. The left-hand door on the side shown above has a contact switch that when opened, turns on an internal light and starts a vibrator motor driven simulated fan. Inside is also an orange generator that is the same as on the No. 3520 searchlight car I have. Note that I have the original box for this car.The picture below shows the doors open and the light on inside.

No. 3530 Operating Generator Car with Light On Inside

The top of the car has ventilation holes through which you can see the light and the simulated fan turning. The picture below shows the top of the car with the interior light shining through.

No. 3530 Operating Generator Car Top View with Light On Inside

My generator car has blue fuel tanks below the doors. Other versions have black fuel tanks. The car originally came with a telephone pole/transformer and a searchlight that can be connected to the top of the car and the searchlight illuminates when the door is opened. The telephone pole/transformer and searchlight could also be purchased separately as Lionel # 3530-30. The generator car with the telephone pole/transformer and searchlight connected are shown in the picture below.

No. 3530 Operating Generator Car With Telephone Pole, Transformer and Searchlight

The picture below shows the setup with the searchlight illuminated as powered by the generator car.

No. 3530 Operating Generator Car With Telephone Pole, Transformer and Searchlight Illuminated


No. 6362 Railway Truck Car

The picture above shows a Lionel #6362 Railway Truck Car (manufactured 1955-1957). This car has an unpainted orange plastic body mounted on a blued steel chassis. The car has bar-end metal trucks and magnetic couplers. The cargo load for this car are three 479-1 bar end metal trucks.


No. 6464-1 Western Pacific Box Car

The picture above shows a Lionel #6464-1 Western Pacific box car (manufactured from 1953-1954). This box car was the first car in the 6464 series of box cars. I understand the 6464-1 Western Pacific is a fairly common car. It was included in sets as well as being available for separate sale. The 6464-1 Western Pacific includes a silver painted shell with blue lettering, type I body style, single block sliding doors, bar-end trucks with two operating couplers, and a single brakewheel. The silver paint on this car tends to fade with age but the silver paint on mine is reasonably bright. The blue lettering on mine in in good shape also.


No. 6464-25 Great Northern Box Car

The picture above shows a #6464-25 Great Northern Box Car (manufactured from 1953-1954). The body of this car is painted flat orange with white heat-stamped lettering including the Great Northern herald.


No. 6464-75 Rock Island Box Car

The picture above shows a #6464-75 Rock Island Box Car (manufactured from 1953-1954). The body of this car is painted green with gold heat-stamped lettering. The doors are also painted green. The complete 6464-75 number was not painted on the car - only "6464" was painted on the car.


No. 6464-275 State of Maine Box Car

The picture above shows a Lionel #6464-275 State of Maine Box Car (manufactured from 1955-1959). This is a colorful box car with red, white, and blue horizontal stripes. On my car, the body is molded blue plastic and the white and red colors are painted on. My car has bar-end trucks indicating it is of the early production. It also has tab couplers.


No. 6464-375 Central of Georgia Box Car

The picture above shows a Lionel #6464-375 Central of Georgia Box Car (manufactured from 1956-1957). This car has a maroon-colored body with a silver oval painted on the side. The roof is also painted silver. The lettering outside the oval is heat stamped. The Central of Georgia herald is a decal. My car has bar end trucks, one of which has a tab coupler - the other coupler does not have the tab.
Lionel No. 6468 Baltimore & Ohio Automobile Transport Box Car

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 6468 Baltimore & Ohio Automobile Transport Car (manufactured from 1953-1955). This is a double-door boxcar and actual boxcars of this type were used to transport automobiles before the auto-loader and auto-rack railroad cars became popular. Note that the doors are not in the center of the car (horizontally). My car is in fairly good shape but there are some rust stains to the right of the doors below the upper door rail and on the other side near the bottom. My car is the more common blue car.


No. X3464 N.Y.C. Box Car and No. 6464-425 New Haven Box Car

The picture above shows a No. X3464 New York Central Box Car (manufactured from 1949-1952) and a No. 6464-425 New Haven Boxcar (manufactured 1956-1958) on a track in front of my No. 256 freight station. The X3464 is an operating boxcar. When the car is over an UCS remote control track section and the "uncouple" button is pressed, the door will slide open and the man inside will move toward the door as shown in the photo. My car is an older version as it has the staple-end trucks. Note that I have the original box and instruction sheet for this car. The New Haven boxcar is highly sought after for its contrasting colors. Mine has the unpainted black body and the "N" has the full Serif type font.


No. 3472 Operating Milk Car & No. 3462P Milk Car Platform

The picture above shows a #3472 Operating Milk Car (manufactured from 1949 - 1953) that I have. Five milk cans came with the car (the original set had 7 cans). I have the #3462P milk car platform, and the original box for this set. This set is probably Lionel's most popular accessory. This car is a reliable accessory and only occasionally needs cleaning and alignment. I had the platform with my original train set I received from my cousin, but later I purchased the car with the 5 cans and box. The #3472 Operating Milk Car is listed on page 28 of the 1952 catalog as shown below.

No. 3472 Operating Milk Car in 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

After I received the car, I rewired the car to replace the old wiring that was brittle and had cracked insulation. I adjusted and oiled the mechanism and now the car works well. Below are some pictures showing how the car works.

No. 3472 Operating Milk Car with Man Placing Milk Cans on Platform

The picture above shows the man inside the car placing a milk can on the platform. Although in this picture you can see through the door and out the door on the opposite side, the car has doors on both sides. I removed the door on the opposite side to manually activate the mechanism for taking this picture. Below are pictures showing the internal mechanism.



Internal Mechanism of No. 3472 Operating Milk Car

As shown above, the mechanism is fairly simple being driven by a single solenoid activated by a special track section that is used to unload my log and coal cars. The special track section also decouples cars. The milk cans are loaded into the car through a door in the top of the car. The cans roll down an inclined trough starting at the top left and ending just to the left of the milk man. You can see the solenoid in the left foreground. When activated, the solenoid plunger moves inward. Below is a picture of the other side of the car.


Internal Mechanism of No. 3472 Operating Milk Car Showing Milk Can to be Captured

The picture above shows the solenoid activated the initial time after loading. At that time, a milk can falls out of the trough and is uprighted ready for the milk man to capture it. You can see the can just to the right of the man and partially obscured by the mechanism. The next time the solenoid is activated, the can is captured by the man as shown below.

Internal Mechanism of No. 3472 Operating Milk Car Milk Can Captured by Man

In the picture above, you can see the man has the can is ready to move it out of the car. The picture below shows the man placing the can on the platform.

Man in No. 3472 Operating Milk Car Placing Milk Can on Platform

In the picture above, the solenoid is fully activated and the man would be outside the car placing the can on the platform. The milk cans have a tiny magnet on the bottom to hold them on the mechanism. The platform deck is supposed to be steel so the cans will "stick" to it. I lost my original platform deck and I made a replacement from aluminum, but the cans do not "stick" to aluminum and skid significantly on the deck.

I acquired spare milk cans for the milk car. The spare milk can set is shown below in its original box. Lionel sold the #3462-70 milk can set as a replacement item or for use as extra detailing in a train layout. Note the box is lettered "For use with No. 3462 and No. 3472 Milk Cars." This lettering suggests it was manufactured between 1950 and 1957.

No. 3462-70 Additional Milk Cans

No train layout would be complete without a method to deliver the milk once the train transported the milk to its destination. Therefore, I acquired a diecast replication of the once famous 1950 DIVCO (Detroit Industrial Vehicle Company) milk delivery truck. This truck is shown below.

Diecast Model of a 1950 DIVCO Milk Delivery Truck

This diecast model is a Lionel Licensed Product manufactured in 2002 by Road Champs. It is a 1:43 scale model. It has written on the side "Lionelville Farms." Beside the truck are three crates containing milk bottles. This model has not ever been removed from its plastic case. The plastic bag surrounding the case is still sealed with the original tape.

Lionel No. 6352 Pacific Fruit Express Refrigerator Car

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 6352 Pacific Fruit Express refrigerator car (manufactured from 1955-1957). This car was originally built to accompany the Lionel No. 352 Icing Station. The car has an unpainted orange body with black heat-stamped lettering. The number on the car is actually 63521. A special sliding roof panel allows the plastic ice cubes to be loaded from the icing station platform. There is a compartment inside to collect the ice cubes and a special door on the side (to the right of the brown door) allows access to the compartment to remove the cubes.
Lionel No. 3474 Western Pacific Operating Box Car

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 3474 Western Pacific Operating Box car (manufactured 1952-1953). This box car is the most colorful of the 9 1/4 inch operating box cars. Its body is painted silver and a large Western Pacific yellow-orange feather decal stretches most of the car's length. It also has a smaller decal with the Western Pacific "Rides Like a Feather" slogan in the upper right corner. The box car has an operating mechanism inside on which rides a blue rubber man. When the car is over the decoupling track section and the decouple button is pressed, the plunger on the bottom of the car is activated, the door slides open, and the man moves toward the door as shown in the lower photograph. I do not have the box for this car. My car works well.

Lionel No. 6672 Refrigerator Car

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 6672 Refrigerator Car (manufactured from 1954 - 1956). This car has the Santa Fe markings (SFRD) and is a model of a mechancal refrigerator car. The car has no "ice hatches" like other refrigerator ("reefer") cars (such as the No. 3472 car above) because the car is "cooled" by mechanical temperature control (a refrigeration system). The car is longer than older "reefer" cars as this car is 10 1/8 incles long. The sides and floor of the car are molded a a single piece of unpainted white plastic and the roof and ends are molded as a single piece of unpainted brown plastic. The doors on either sides are molded of unapinted brown plastic and when in position over the door opening, a leaf spring in the door guide pushes them down into place. You have to pull the door outward slightly to open the door. Note there is an aluminum refrigeration control panel on the lower left. When you slide the panel to the left, controls are revealed and the manufacturer name Carrier is revealed. The picture below shows the panel opened.

Lionel No. 6672 Refregerator Car with Refrigerator Control Door Open

The car has bar end metal trucks with tab couplers. My car is in good shape; however, there is some rust on the door guides. Note that I have the original box for this car. The box is in good shape with 397 marked on it. I presume that marking indicated the sale price; however, in the 1954 Lionel catalog, the factory recommended price for this car was $5.95. My car is the later version as there are 2 lines of data to the right of the door.

Lionel No. 6346 "Alcoa" Car

The picture above is a Lionel No. 6346 Alcoa Aluminum hopper car (manufactured 1956 only). This is one of the few covered hopper cars manufactured by Lionel. This car has a silver painted body, blue lettering, bar end trucks, one brakewheel, and a stick-on Alcoa Aluminum emblem on both sides. The actual number painted on the side is "643656." The car is long measuring 10 3/4 inches, not including the couplers on each end.

The cover has 12 hatches; however, mine has 2 hatches missing as the hatches are fragile and the hinges easily broken. Replacements can be obtained for the missing hatches. Note that I have the original box for this car. One of box end flaps is detached, but present, and the other is missing.


Lionel X6014 Baby Ruth Scout-Type Boxcar

The picture above shows a Baby Ruth Scout-type boxcar (manufactured 1951-1956). The doors on this inexpensive boxcar do not open and the brakewheel is molded into the plastic.


Lionel No. 41 Switcher

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 41 Switcher (manufactured from 1955-1958) that I have. This unit is modeled after the experimental gas turbine switching engine built by the Davenport Locomotive works for the US Army Transportation Corps. The prototype switcher is powered by two Boeing gas turbines. The top speed of the Davenport locomotive is only 35 mph and Lionel designed its version to also be considerably slower than their other road locomotives. The actual twin Boeing turbine-powered locomotive is preserved at the National Museum of Transportation in St. Louis, MO.

Both the real and Lionel versions are intended for light yard work and should not be expected to pull no more than 3-4 freight cars.

The Lionel No. 41 has a ornamental horn, three position E-unit, and operating couplers on the front and rear. My unit is made of black plastic. Note that I have the the original box and the attendant operating instructions. On the box, the price is written as $11.50. It is worth considerably more than that now. My unit works well both forward and reverse. All wondow struts are present; however two on one side are cracked. These struts are easily broken with your thumb when picking up the engine.


Lionel No. 53 Rio Grande Snow Plow

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 53 Rio Grande snow plow (manufacured 1957-1960) I have. This motorized unit unit is based on the Vulcan 2-4-2 switcher. The cab is painted yellow and the remainder is unpainted black plastic. There is an unpainted yellow snowplow blade on the front and an operating coupler on the rear. It has an E-uint internal that changes direction with power interruptions similar to my Santa Fe locomotive. Notice the window strut is broken but all of it is still there. The one on the other side is also broken. This is a common problem with these units as the struts are thin and is in the perfect place for your thumb to press it in when you pick the unit up.


Lionel No. 60 Trolley

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 60 trolley (manufactured from 1955-1958). This unit is based on the Birney design and has a reversing mechanism similar to the No. 50 gang car. It has an unpainted yellow body and an unpainted red roof. The lettering was applied with heat-stamping. The lettering on my unit is black indicating it is a unit produced early in the production. Mine does not have the motormen that were included in the very first units.

The unit has a trolley pole on the top (that in a real trolley collected power from an overhead wire). The pole swings around in the opposite direction when the trolley strikes an obstruction. My car has the spring-type bumpers on the front and rear that make the car reverse when it strikes an obstruction.

The inside of the car is illuminated and there are silhouettes of passengers printed on the frosted windows.

When I received my car, I had to perform some repairs: resolder the 2 field coils wires, replace the motor ball bearing, repair one motor brush, take the car apart and oil and regrease it, replace the interior lamp, clean the entire car. The result of this work produced a gool-looking car that runs very well.

Click on the picture below and you can see a short movie of the car in action. The continuous "buzz" yoou hear is the vibrotor of the No. 155 Ringing Signal next to the train station. The bell of the ringing signal is difficult to hear in this video.




Lionel No. 3360 Burro Crane

The picture above shows a Lioenl No. 3360 crane (manufactured from 1956-1957). This self-propelled crane is a replica of the small crane manufactured by Cullen-Friestedt of Chicago for railroads. The body of the Lionel crane is molded in yellow and has red heat-stamped lettering. The crane can go backwards and forward with the direction controlled by a lever on the side shown that could be moved by a track-side activator. A lever on the opposite top side controls whether the crane moves or the cab rotates - the direction depending on the position of the lever on the side. That lever can also place the crane in "neutral" (middle position) so it does not move. The lever on the back of the cab disables cab rotation and allows the operator to raise and lower the block and tackle - the direction up or down depending on the position of the lever on the side. The crane has a non-operating coupler on each end to allow it to pull light loads. I have the original box with the insert for this crane. Note the price when purchased new is on the box and the price was $15.95.
Model 2002 Handcar Manufactured by Louis Marx & Co.

The picture above shows a two-person handcar (Model 2002) manufactured by Louis Marx & CO, Inc. The car was the second version of this model and was manufactured from 1955 to 1956. This car is electrically powered and controlled with the transformer like a locomotive. For a long time the two railroad workers on each end of the arm were missing. I found a source of repair parts and replaced them as shown above. The car supposed to have one blue and one gray man. As the car goes down the track, the men appear to pump the arm up and down.

I understand this red version is relatively hard to find. The previous version was also red but the two men were yellow. The subsequent version was brown with blue and gray men. My car does have some damage - there are two short bumpers broken off one end and part of the top of the car is also broken on one side. One of the handles for one of men is also broken. These defects do not significantly detract from the car.


Lionel No. 50 Section Gang Car

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 50 Gang Car (manufactured from 1954-1964). This was the first of the series of motorized units that Lionel manufactured. This car is self-propelled and has 3 men, two blue and one olive-colored. The car has an unpainted orange body and brushplate and an ornamental horn. The car has two blue rubber bumpers on either end and when one of the bumpers strikes an obstruction, the car reverses direction and the olive-colored man rotates to the other side of the car. This car was relatively inexpensive and is small.

I believe my car was manufactured between 1955 and 1959 because the bumper bracket is U-shaped. Later versions were L-shaped. Note that I have the original box with the operating instructions. The box also contains the carboard insert. This car runs very well.

The No. 50 Section Gang Car as shown on page 8 of the 1959 Lionel Consumer Catalog is shown below. Note the price was only $7.95.

No. 50 Section Gang Car as Shown on Page 8 of the 1959 Lionel Consumer Catalog


No. 258 Tinplate Steam Locomotive (1930s)




No. 258 Steam Engine & No. 257T Tender

The picture above shows a Lionel tinplate steam engine and associated tender. This engine and tender were manufactured in 1930 shortly after Lionel acquired sole ownership of Ives Manufacuring Company. The 258 is identical to the Lionel 257 engine except the 258 has a manual reverse lever. The 258 engine is interesting as it has brass and copper trim with orange-red stripes painted on. This example has the origial paint as it is somewhat pitted and scratched off in several places. But the engine runs well. I believe the 4 drive wheels are replacement because the red-painted spokes are not dull. But the front pilot wheels are original, I believe. Below is a picture of the engine with power applied to the track and the headlight on.

No. 258 Steam Engine with Headlight On & No. 257T Tender

Below is a picture of the side of the engine.

No. 258 Steam Engine

Below is a picture of the bottom of the engine. Note both power pickup rollers are original and in tact. Often, one of the rollers are broken or the roller assembly has been replaced. This example has the original roller assembly with the Lionel name.

No. 258 Steam Engine Pickup Roller Assembly

The tender is also in good shape. The paint on it is also pitted. The tender is missing the brass handrail on the top rear, but it has the brass ladder on the rear. Below is a picture of the tender. The tender has the coal pile that is often missing.

No. 257T Tender

The picture below is a picture of the engine and tender seen from the rear. The lever in the engine cab is the manual direction control. This engine does not have the "E-unit" used to remotely change direction of the train. When the lever is placed in the center position (level) the train is in "neutral".

No. 258 Steam Engine & No. 257T Tender

No. 258 Steam Engine & No. 257T Tender

Below is a picture of the 258 engine and 257T tender pulling four cars.

No. 258 Steam Engine, No. 257T Tender, No. 805 Boxcar, No. 831 Lumber Car, No. 803 Hopper Car, & No.807 Caboose

As shown below, I have a Lionel No. 805 Boxcar (manufactured around 1931). This car has a a dar pea-green body with an orange roof. It has copper journal boxes on the wheel axles. The doors on both sides open. The car has brass ladders on each end along with brass brake wheels and column shafts.

No. 805 Boxcar

Shown below, I have a Lionel No. 831 Lumber (Flat) Car (manufactured in 1935). This car is painted pale green with nickel posts, brekewheels and stands, and nickel journal boxes on the wheel axles. Note that I have the original box for this car and most of the original lumber load.

No. 831 Lumber (Flat) Car

Shown below, I have a No. 803 Hopper Car (manufactured from 1931 to 1934). This car is painted peacock and has brass ladders, nameplates, and brake wheels and shafts. The car has copper journal boxes on the wheel axles. The wheel on the lower side open and closes the hatches on the bottom center of the car.

No. 803 Hopper Car

Shown below I have a Lionel No. 807 caboose (manufactured from 1929-1930) The car is painted red with peacock window inserts and roof. The end railing is brass. The caboose has nickel journal boxes over the wheel axles.

No. 807 Caboose

I also have a Lionel tinplate caboose that I believe was manufactured from 1940-1942. This caboose is a No. 2657. Its coupler is compatible with the 257T tender, so the 258/257T will pull this caboose. The caboose is shown below attached to the 257T tender.

No. 2657 Caboose

Below is a picture of the rear of the No. 2657 caboose attached to the 257T tender.

No. 2657 Caboose


2026 "Prairie" Steam Locomotive (1948 - 1949)




No. 2026 "Prairie" Steam Engine

The picture above is a Lionel model 2026 steam locomotive (manufactured from 1948-1949) that I acquired in 2005. Lionel called this engine a "Prairie-type" locomotive and sold it as an "O27" gauge item. It will run on my "O" gauge track. This locomotive is the older version with a 2-6-2 wheel arrangement and detailed driving wheel hardware. Note the headlight in the center of the boiler and the two green running lamps (actually a translucent "rhinestone") on the top sides of the boiler.

Lionel did not pattern this locomotive on any specific real engine. They combined the features of several popular locomotives to create this model. The locomotive is powered by a transverse motor with a gear ratio of approximately 9 to 1. It operates on 10 -12 Vac with a normal car load. It is equipped with a # 226E-35 reversing E-unit and a # 2026-8 smoke generator synchronized with the motion of the wheels by means of a cam on the interior of the front geared driver wheel and a cam follower on the smoke lever.

The picture below shows two bottles of Lionel Smoke Pellets that are used in the No. 2026 engine. Both bottles are about 75% full.

Lionel SP Smoke Pellets


No. 2026 "Prairie" Steam Engine & No. 6466W Whistling Tender

The locomotive 3-position "E-unit" is similar to my Santa Fe diesel so it will go forward, pause, reverse, pause and then repeats when power is cycled on and off. This steam locomotive has an ornamental bell and whistle and a smoke chamber that actually puffs smoke as it chugs around the track. It also has an illuminated headlight.
I also have the tender (coal car) that was originally sold with this locomotive. It is a model 6466WX and includes a whistling unit inside. The pictures below show the whistling unit inside the tender.

Internal Mechanism of No. 6466W Whistling Tender

The whistling unit comprises a motor that turns a miniature impeller that forces air into a plastic chamber and through an orifice similar to an actual whistle that you blow with your mouth. You can see the motor on the picture on the left. The picture on the right shows the impeller in the middle of the pink-colored chamber. The air exits the chamber on the top. The whistle sounds like a actual train whistle. It is not a shrill sounding whistle, but it sounds realistic. The whistling unit is activated by a lever on the transformer. When the lever is turned, a dc voltage is applied to the track, a dc relay closes and the ac motor begins to turn and the whistle whistles.

Hear the Whistle Blow

I recorded the whistle and you can hear the sound of the whistle by clicking here. In addition to the whistle, you can here the motor running that turns the impeller. The motor noise is not so noticeable with the train running.

I have the original boxes for this locomotive and its tender. They are shown below with the locomotive, tender, and my Timken box car.

No. 2026 "Prairie" Steam Engine & No. 6466W Whistling Tender & Their Original Boxes


Lionel #1426WS Outfit (1948 - 1949)



I have purchased three train cars that were sold with the 2026 locomotive and tender when they were sold as a complete outfit. The #1426WS outfit comprised the 2026 locomotive, the 6646WX whistling tender, two #6440 Pullman passenger cars, and one #6441 Observation car. I also purchased a model 1033 transformer similar to the model 1032 transformer that was included in the outfit. This outfit is shown below. Note that I have the original boxes for the engine, tender, and transformer.

No. 1426WS Outfit

No. 1426WS Outfit

Below is a picture from the Lionel 1948 catalog showing the #1426WS Outfit. Note the price of this outfit in 1948 was $42.75, quite expensive in those days.

No. 1426WS Outfit shown on Pages 6 -7 of the 1948 Consumer Catalog

One #6440 Pullman passenger car (manufactured from 1948-1949) is shown below.

No. 6440 Pullman Car

This "tinplate" passenger car was a continuation of the #2440 passenger car manufactured in 1946 and 1947. The #6440 possesses the updated magnetic couplers in place of the older style coil couplers. The #6440 car is of all metal construction. The body is green with cream-colored windows and doors and plastic frosted window panes. The roof is a darker tint. The car is illuminated.

The #6441 Observation car (manufactured from 1948-1949) is shown below.

No. 6441 Observation Car

This "tinplate" car was a continuation of the #2441 passenger car manufactured in 1946 and 1947. The #6441 possesses the updated magnetic couplers in place of the older style coil couplers. The #6441 car is of all metal construction. The body is green with cream-colored windows and doors and plastic frosted window panes. The roof is a darker tint. The car is illuminated.

The #6441 Observation car is always at the end of the train. The car has no coupler at is rear so no other cars can be attached behind it. The rear of the car has a "porch" where people can stand. The porch reminds me of the "campaign trains" of long ago where candidates stood and waved to their constituents. The rear of the #6441 Observation car is shown. Note the two "rhinestones" above the porch that simulate lanterns.

Rear of No. 6441 Observation Car

Below is a picture of my 2026 locomotive and 6466WX tender with one of my #6440 Pullman cars and the #6441 Observation car. I have the track power on and you can see the cars illuminated.

Nos. 2026, 6466WX, 6440, and 6441 Train

Nos. 2026, 6466WX, 6440, and 6441 Train

Click on the picture below to see a short video clip of the train running around a short oval loop.


No. 3559 Coal Dumping Car

The picture above shows a Lionel #3559 Coal Dumping Car (manufactured from 1946 - 1948). This is a primitive-looking coal car that is a carryover design from earlier Lionel coal car designs such as the #3659 car manufactured from 1938 to 1942. The #3559 car is a predecessor to the #3469 automatic dumping ore car I have and shown earlier.
The features of the #3559 car include a painted red metal dumping hopper, painted black sheet metal frame and a bakelite housing covering the operating mechanism. There is a metal footstep on each corner of the frame and the item number #3559 is stamped in silver on the bottom of the frame. My car is the later version with staple-end trucks and coil couplers.
Note that I have the original box and box insert for this car. The box has no end flaps but it is in good shape otherwise. I also have a #207 bag of coal and the #160 bakelite bin that the coal is dumped into; both came with the car. The car looks like new with hardly a scratch anywhere on it. It evidently was never used, or used only a few times. The car couplers and dumping hopper work well.

Below are pages 24 -25 of the 1948 Lionel Consumer Catalog showing the No. 3559 "Operating Dumping Car" as the catalog describes it. Note the car was priced at $5.50 in 1948.

Pages 24-25 of the 1948 Lionel Consumer Catalog showing the No. 3559 Coal Dumping Car



No. X2454 Baby Ruth Box Car

The picture above shows a Lionel X2454 Baby Ruth boxcar. This boxcar is shorter than the other boxcars I have being only 9 1/4 inches long. This car was introduced by Lionel in 1946 and discontinued in 1947. It is painted orange with Baby Ruth and PRR logos in black. The doors are die-cast metal and painted brown. The boxcar has staple-end trucks and the older style coil couplers.


1872 "General" Steam Engine (1959-1962)




No. 1872LT "General" Steam Engine Train

The picture above is an #1872 steam engine with its #1862T tender. Lionel classified this engine as a "General" or Civil War style engine. It is a good representation of an actual American locomotive of the mid to late 1800s and was patterned after the "General" civil war engine.

Below are pages 20 and 21 from the 1959 Lionel Consumer catalog that introduced the "5-Star General Train outfit for the first year it was sold.

No. 1872 "5-Star General" Steam Engine Train from page 21 of Lionel Consumer Catalog

The actual "General" locomotive was made famous by James J. Andrews and a group of Union spies who stole the engine in 1862 to use it for burning bridges and tunnels between Chattanooga, TN and Atlanta, GA. This locomotive was further made famous by the Walt Disney movie entitled "The Great Locomotive Chase" starring Fess Parker that was released in 1956. Lionel wanted to capitalize on the popularity of this movie and therefore released the #1862 locomotive (an O27 gauge) and the 1872 (a Super O gauge). Lionel did not replicate the "Texas" locomotive nor two other locomotives used in pursuit of the "General" locomotive.

The actual "General" locomotive is on display at the Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History in Kennesaw, GA which is northwest of Atlanta, GA. You can see pictures of the original "General" by clicking here.

The 1872 "General" features a 4-4-0 wheel arrangement, gray painted plastic boiler, a red cab with gold lettering, a 3-position E unit, wire handrails, "Magnetraction" (magnetized wheels), an internal weight for added traction, a gold ornamental bell, a black ornamental whistle (mine has the whistle exit broken off but I have purchased 2 replacements), a smoke unit, and a functional headlight.

I also have three cars of the "General" train set. The cars I have include the #1866 Western & Atlantic mail car, the #1865 Western & Atlantic passenger car, and the #1877 horse car that is not shown here. The cars are good representations of actual railroad cars of that type in the 1800s. Below is a side view of my "General" train.

No. 1872 "General" Steam Engine Train

Below is page 43 of the 1959 Lionel Consumer Catalog showing the cars of the General train set for separate sell.

Page 43 of the 1959 Lionel Consumer Catalog


Below is a picture of my General train outfit.

No 1872 "General" Train Outfit






Southern GP-38 6-28843 Diesel Switcher Engine (2004)




No. 6-28843 Southern GP-38 Diesel Switcher Engine

The picture above is my newest Lionel item. This is a Southern Railway GP-38 switcher engine made in 2004. This engine is new in the box and has never been used. The number on the side of the engine reads 2730. This engine features dual maintenance free motors, metal frame, a diesel horn, and is illuminated. It is transformer operated and will operate on my 50-year old transformers that I have. However, the engine is modernized with a solid-state E-unit for direction control and the diesel horn is electronically synthesized. There is a speaker on the underside of the engine to produce the diesel horn sound. The engine is not American made - it is made in China.

This engine was part of a Southern Diesel Freight set that had 4 cars. I do not have the other cars, but I do have the original box for this engine, the owner's manual for the set, a Lionel Model Railroading booklet, and an Instruction Video that came with the engine. These items are shown below with the engine and a Southern Woodside caboose I also have.

No. 6-28843 Southern GP-38 Diesel Switcher Engine

I have two Southern Railway cabooses. These cabooses are shown below.

Nos. X9259 & 6-17601 Southern Cabooses

The picture above shows two relatively modern Southern Railway cabooses that I have. The one on the left is a #X9259 bay window lighted caboose (manufactured 1-1988). This caboose has a emblem on the right for the city of Cincinnati, Ohio. The car on the right is a Lionel #6-17601 Southern Standard "O" Woodside Lighted Caboose (manufactured in 1986). Notice the Southern Railway emblem in the center. The emblem says "The Southern Serves the South."


No. 6-28843 Southern GP-38 Diesel Switcher Engine & No. 6-17601 Caboose


Train Accessories




Below are pictures of numerous railroad accessories I have.



No. 132 Illuminated Station

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 132 Illuminated Station I have (manufactured 1949-1955. In addition to a light inside, this station has a bimetallic operating mechanism inside that when operated with an insulated track section, stops the train for a short time (adjustable) and then allows the train to proceed as if it stopped to pick up passengers. The accessory is a replica of a suburban train station. The building is white with green trim and a green roof mounted on a maroon base. The chimney is painted red. Note I have the original box and instructions for this accessory.

No. 145 Gateman & No. 256 Freight Station

The picture above shows on the far left a #145 operating gateman and his building (1950-1966). When the train comes by, the man opens the door and comes out swinging a lantern which is missing on mine in this picture. Also there used to be a railroad crossing "crossbuck" sign that has been broken off. The #145 operating gateman is called a #145 Automatic Crossing Watchman in the Lionel 1952 catalog as shown below. I also have the #252 Crossing Gate shown in the image.

No. 145 Automatic Crossing Watchman & No. 252 Crossing Gate in 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

As shown in the photograh above, I also have a #256 illuminated freight station (manufactured between 1950-1953) similar to model #356. Note the advertising signs. You might recognize some popular products. This freight station does not have the baggage handlers pulling their carts around the station like the model 356 does. The Lionel 1952 catalog calls the #256 illiminated freight station a #256 Wayside Station on page 33 as shown below

No. 256 Wayside Station on Page 33 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

The pictures below show the #145 operating gateman in operation. Note that I have replaced the "crossbuck" sign, replaced the lantern, and replaced the frosted window pane in the door.

No. 145 Gateman in Operation

The picture on the left shows the gateman in the building with its internal light on waiting for a train to approach. The picture on the right shows the gateman with the door open and out of the building. Note the red lantern he is holding. This lantern had been missing from my gateman for a long time, but I was able to replace the lantern. The crossbuck sign on the right was also missing for a long time, but I was able to find a replacement for that also.

The operating gateman was a very popular accessory for Lionel trains in the 1950s. I understand thousands were produced. Everyone likes to see the gateman come out of his building when the train approaches. The building has a maroon-colored roof and the toolbox attached to the side of the building has a red-colored top. This combination of colors indicates this accessory was probably manufactured in 1951. The gateman uses a #145C contactor for activation.

Water Tower and Rotating Beacon Made By Louis Marx & Co.

The picture above shows a water tower with its original box (manufactured by Loius Marx & Co.,Inc.) and a searchlight beacon (manufactured by Louis Marx & CO, Inc.) that is missing the rotating enclosure and the red and green lenses. The bulb on top of the searchlight tower has a dimple in it. The lightweight rotating enclosure had a pin that fit in the dimple and vanes in the top of the enclosure. Heat from the bulb rising through the vanes made the enclosure rotate. I have both lenses, and have remade the enclosure out of brass.



No. 197 Rotating Radar Antenna

The picture above shows on the far right a Lionel No.#197 airport surveillance radar (cataloged from 1957-1959). Note that I have the original box for the radar. When this picture was made, the reflector for the radar was broken and has several pieces missing.

I have since repaired the reflector and the results are shown below. I also replaced the vertical whip antenna. The radar antenna rotates. There is a vibrator at the base of the antenna that runs on 8-9 Vac. When it vibrates, the radar antenna rotates clockwise.

No. 197 Rotating Radar Antenna


Below is the No. 197 radar as pictured in the 1959 Lionel Consumer Catalog. Note the price was only $5.95 back then. The vintage radar with its box sells much more that that now.

No. 197 Rotating Radar as Pictured on Page 5 of the 1959 Lionel Consumer Catalog

Lionel No. 352 Icing Station


The picture above shows a Lionel No. 352 Icing Station (manufactured from 1955-1957). This accessory simulated a railroad refrigerator car icing platform. This example is the earlier version of as it has a brown platform with a white structure mounted on it. Later versions had a red platform. A blue plastic man with orange arms and paddle pushes the plastic ice cube into the top of the specially-made refrigerator car (Lionel No. 6352) when the accesory is activated. I have 3 ice cubes that came with the car and I purchased two additional ones to made a quantity of 5 that originally came with the unit.

The picture below shows the Lionel No. 6352 refrigerator car beside the icing station.

Lionel No. 352 Icing Station with No. 6532 Refrigerator Car


The pictues below shows the man pushing an ice cube into the car.





Lionel No. 182 Triple Action Magnetic Gantry Crane

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 182 Triple Action Gantry Crane (manufactured from 1946-1949). The unit has a black bakelite base with a silver metal tower structure. A plastic Lionel No. 2460-type crane cab is mounted on top. The cab has a pained gray smoke stack that is not molded as part of the cab. The cab is mounted on a die-cast base that will swivel 360 degrees. An elaborate gear box with clutches allows a single motor to swivel the crane left or right and raise or lower the blodk and tackle. The hook can lift an electromagnet that can be activated to lift metal objects such as the metal culverts of my No. 342 culvert loader. The electromagnet is marked "Cutler Hammer." The unit is controlled by a special rectangular control that has 4 push buttons - 2 for left/right swivel and 2 for up/down of the block and tackle. A rotary knob in the center activates the electromagnetic and when activated, a red light inside the cab illuminates.

No. 455 Operating Oil Derrick and Pump


The picture above shows an impressive and highly sought after accessory. It is the Lionel #455 Oil Derrick (manufactured from 1950-1954). Since Lionel produced so many Sunoco tank cars like my #6415 tank car shown in the picture, it was only natural that Lionel replicated the source of the oil. This accessory is based upon a typical mid-west America oil derrick built in the 1930s-1940s. The derrick is almost 15 inches high and is colorful making it stand out on any train layout.

The derrick has a red-painted metal base, green metal tower, a Sunoco sign, a glass tube used to simulte oil being pumped, a orange plastic simulated generator, and a red pumping beam and pumper. Also included are 4 aluminum oil drums, a black plastic oil drum rack, and a operating crank on the rear that raises and lowers a hook.

The pumping is driven by a solenoid controlled by a bimetallic switch that cycles power on and off to the solenoid. This action makes the pumping arm go up and down simulating the pumping action. The glass tube is illuminated by a light bulb underneath the red base. The bulb heats the "oil" and it bubbles adding to the illusion that oil is being pumped.

In the picture above, I have the derrick in operation. You can see the glass tube illuminated and the bubbles in the "oil". Also the time exposure picture caught the pumping arm in motion.

This particular derrick is the common version with the dark green tower with matching upper platform. Ther earliest version had a red-painted upper platform. Another rare version had a pale green-painted tower.

Typically, the Sunoco sign and the 4 oil drums are missing. That was the case when I purchased mine. But I was able to find a source of replicated parts and I purchased the Sunoco sign, 5 oil drums (the 5th drum is on the left as if being filled with the pipe valve), and the crank for the bobbin that moves the hook up and down. I also replaced the string that winds around the bobbin and goes through the hook and secures to the top of the tower.

This accessory is an on/off accessory and works very well.

The #455 Operating Oil Derrick and Pump is described on page 12 of the 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog I have. The portion of that page describing the derrick is shown below. Note the sugested retail price is $9.95.

No. 455 Operating Oil Derrick and Pump on Page 12 of the 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog


Note that the catalog shows the derrick with a red top. That color configuration is the earliest version. Mine is the later version with the top the same dark green color as the lower structure. Another version has a light green painted structure and top.


No. 397 Operating Coal Loader


The picture above shows a Lionel #397 Operating Coal Loader (manufactured from 1948-1957) I have. It features a gray metal base, a red plastic bin, rubber conveyor belt, black metal conveyor support structure, and a transparent coal deflector shield on the top of the structure. This accessory is interesting to watch as it is full of action, noise, and excitement. It requires only one track for operation. It has a red receiving bin into which coal is dumped. The receiving bin is activated by a cam and it agitates to vibrate the coal toward the rear of the bin where a rubber conveyor belt lifts the coal up over and drops the coal into the car. The early version of this accessory had a yellow diesel motor housing and a #70 yard light mounted to the gray base. Very early in production the yard light was deleted and the diesel motor housing was painted blue.

Mine is the later version with the blue diesel motor housing. Note that I have the original box showing a price of $14.50. One each #206 and #207 bags of coal were included with my coal loader as shown in the photo. Also shown in the photo is my #3469 Automatic Dumping Ore Car receiving the coal from the coal loader. The rubber conveyor belt rots over time and I had to replace my belt. After replacing the belt and lubricating the motor, it operates well.

The #397 Operating Coal Loader is described on pages 30-31 of the 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog I have. Portions of these pages are shown below. Note that the suggested retail price is $13.25 which is less than the price on the box of the loader that I have. Also note that the drawing of the coal loader is reversed - the diesel motor in the drawing is on the left; however, on the actual coal loader, the diesel motor is on the right.


No. 397 Diesel-type Operating Coal Loader on Pages 30-31 of the 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog




No. 445 Operating Switch Tower


The picture above shows a Lionel No. 445 Operating Switch Tower (introduced in 1952). This item represents a trackside tower wher operators inside controlled the interlocking and signaling systems of American railroads. Lionel's device contained two men, one on the balcony, and one on the stairway with the intent of them being a single man who spots a train from the balcony and then runs down the stairs with a lantern. The structure is white with green windows, balcony, and roof. On the roof is a red chimney. Note I have the original box for this accessory. Below are two pictures, one showing the structure lighted and the other picture showing the accessory activated with the man down at the foot of the stairs.

No. 445 Operating Switch Tower, Illuminated

No. 445 Operating Switch Tower, Illuminated and Activted




Homemade Building & No. 450 Operating Signal Bridge

The picture above shows one of the handmade buildings I built long ago. Also shown is a #450 Operating Signal Bridge "traffic light" (manufactured from 1952 to 1958) for the trains. When the train goes under, the lights change from green to red. The signal bridge uses two #153C contactors, one for each light pair. The #450 signal bridge is called a #450 New Operating Signal Bridge on page 22 of the 1952 Lionel catalog as shown below.

No. 450 Operating Signal Bridge on Page 22 of the 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog


Railroad Crossings


No. 154 Flashing Highway Signal & No. 252 Crossing Gates With Marx No. 0446 Rotating Beacon

The picture above shows several railroad crossings I have.

In the center background you can see a model 154 crossing signal with two red lights. The die-cast metal crossbuck sign on this signal suggests it was manufactured between 1945 and 1949 (later versions used plastic crossbuck signs). The two red lights will alternately illuminate as a train passes by. This crossing signal requires a special contactor (#154C) that attaches on the outer rail of the track and to the center rail. The outer rail contact is actually two separate contacts electrically isolated from the rail. When the train wheels short a contact to the rail, the respective light illuminates. Thus as the wheels traverse the contacts going from one to the other, the lights alternately illuminate. At times, both lights will simultaneously illuminate. You can see the #154C contactor on the far track between the crosssing gates.

The #154 crossing signal is called a #154 Flashing Highway Signal and is listed on page 32 of the 1952 Lionel catalog as shown below. I also have the #153 Automatic Block Signal shown on that same page.

No. 154 Flashing Highway Signal & No. 153 Automatic Block Signal on Page 32 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

Also in the background of the photograph you can see the beacon tower manufactured by Marx. I have made a housing for the red and green lenses out of brass and you can see the green lens clearly on the left and the red lens on the right.

You can see two model 252 crossing gates (manufactured between 1950 and 1963), one on either side of the two sets of tracks in the photograph. When a train approaches, the gate arms descend and the two red lights on each arm illuminate. The gates rise and the red lights extinguish after the train passes. The crossing gates use a #145C contactor for activation. As noted above, the #252 Crossing Gate is listed on page 30 and 31 of the 1952 Lionel catalog.

In the right background, you can see the model 145 operating gateman building (manufactured 1950-1966) with its internal light on. The gateman is inside waiting for a train to approach.

The pictures below shows views of the railroad crossings with my 2026 steam engine sufficiently near to activate the crossings. In the first picture, the two red lights of the model 154 crossing signal are both illuminated because the train is stopped. Note that the gateman is also out of his building warning that a train is near.

No. 154 Flashing Highway Signal, No. 252 Crossing Gates, & No.145 Gateman in Operation

The picture below is another view. The engine is moved back and only one red light on the model 154 crossing signal is activated.


No. 154 Flashing Highway Signal, No. 252 Crossing Gates, & No.145 Gateman in Operation


Lionel No. 155 Ringing Signal

I have Lionel No. 155 Ringing Signal shown above (manufactured from 1955-1957). This signal was modeled on the flashing warning signals commonly used at railroad grade crossings and combines a ringing bell with two alternately flashing red warning lights. Activation of the signal is usually controlled by a pressure-type No. 155C contactor where the weight of the passing train makes an electrical connection.

The mechanism of the signal is powered by an adaptation of the Lionel "vibrotor". You can see and hear the ringing signal is action by clicking HERE. The noise of the vibrotor almost masks the bell sound, but if you listen closely, you can hear the faint bell sound.

I also have a #140 Banjo Signal (manufactured from 1954-1966). This unique signal is shown below. This signal is used at a road crossing to signal a train is approaching. The view on the left shows the signal when deactivated. Note that I have the original box. A price of $4.95 is marked on one end. I also have the #145C contactor and instruction sheet for this signal. When a train approaches, a red light illuminates and the "stop" sign begins swinging back and forth periodically blocking the light to simulate a flashing light. The view on the right shows the activated signal with the stop sign partially blocking the light.

No. 140 Banjo Signal

The No. 140 Banjo Signal as pictued on page 8 of the 1959 Lionel Consumer Catalog is shown below. Note its price was only $5.95.

No. 140 Banjo Signal as Pictured on Page 8 of the 1959 Lionel Consumer Catalog


I have a #151 Automatic Semaphore (manufactured from 1947-1969). The semaphore, shown in the center of the picture below features a black painted base, a silver steel pole, a red ladder on the back side, and a functional light and semaphore arm with individual green and red lenses. The semaphore is used to inform approaching trains that it is OK to proceed down the next section of track. It is usually located to the right of the track so the engineer can see it. In the picture below, the yellow semaphore arm is upright and the light is green indicating it is OK to proceed down the next section of track.

No. 151 Automatic Semaphore

The picture below shows the semaphore indicating it is not OK to proceed. Note that the semaphore arm is horizontal and the light is red. I used my 2026 steam locomotive to trip the semaphore and the other crossing accessories previously discussed and shown in picture.

No. 151 Automatic Semaphore Tripped By Train

The #151 Automatic Sempore is listed on page 32 of the 1952 Lionel catalog as shown below.

No. 151 Automatic Semaphore on Page 32 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

I also have a #153 Automatic Block Signal (manufactured from 1945-1959). The block signal, shown in the center of the picture below, features a green painted base, a silver steel pole, an orange ladder on the back side and a functional red and green light at the top mounted on a black base. The block signal is used to inform an approaching train that it is OK to proceed down the next section of track (i.e. a "block" of track). The block signal uses a #153C contactor for controlling the lights. My block signal uses 12-16 Volt lamps with bayonet mounts indicating this signal was made after 1950. As noted above, the #153 Automatic Block Signal is listed on page 32 of the 1952 Lionel catalog.

The picture below shows the block signal with its green light on. Note that I also have the original box for the signal. I also have the contactor, connecting wires, an instruction leaflet, a #CTC power lockon, fibre pins for "O" and "O27" track, and another instruction leaflet that all came with this block signal. The items that came with this signal provide the capability to run two trains on a single track, activate the signal, and stop the following train when the front train is within a certain block. The instruction leaflets tell how to build this type of track layout.

No. 153 Automatic Block Signal, No. 077 Crossing Gate, 1877 Horse Car, and Homemade Building

Also shown in the picture above is a very old Lionel #077 crosssing gate for "O" gauge track. The gate can be seen in the center foreground to the right of the block signal. I do not know the age of this crossing gate, but a tag on it says it was patented on Sept. 21, 1915 and I understand this gate was made circa 1939. When I received this gate, the wires to the solenoid were disconnected from the terminal posts on the back of the mountng plate. I soldered new wires from the solenoid to the terminal posts and the gate works well after oiling the solenoid plunger. There are no lights on this gate - the white sections and the red circular "stop" sign on the arm are on a paper strip on the inside of the arm. The gate uses the same #145C contactor as the newer Lionel #252 crossing gates I have. When activated, the solenoid pushes upward and the arm lowers. When deactivated the solenoid retracts and the the gate rises by the weights located on the rear of the arm. The #252 crossing gates use this same operating principle.

Also seen in the picture above, is my Lionel #1877 horse car that is part of my #1872 General train outfit described above. It can be seen on the right in front of the train station that I built from scratch.

On the left of the picture above, you can see another building I built from scratch. This building is a train yard building typical of train yards of long ago.

Below is a picture showing the same view above but with the red light of the block signal on.

No. 153 Automatic Block Signal, No. 077 Crossing Gate, and Homemade Building

I also have another version of the #77 crossing gate. This gate is the #77N crossing gate (manufactued from 1936-1939). This gate is shown in the photograph below.

No. 77N Crossing Gate

This gate is very similar to the #77 gate shown earlier. The main difference is that the #77N gate has a red light on the arm that illuminates when the gate lowers as the train approaches. The #77N gate post is painted red rather than black as with the #77 gate. The picture above shows the gate up and down with the red light illuminated. The gate is in mint condition with few scratches. The wiring is also pristine. Note that I have the original box for the gate.

I have a Lionel No. 93 water tank (manufactured from 1946-1949). It is shown in the picture below.

No. 93 Water Tank

In the picture above, the water tank is shown with my Lionel 2026 locomotive, that was manufactured during the time the water tank was manufactured. The tank was probably intended as an accessory for this engine. This water tank is painted silver with a manually-lowered black spout. It also has a red base. A large "Lionel Trains" decal with red letters outlined in black is applied to the front of the tank. The decal has a thin black border. Note that I have the original box for this accessory. Note the price marked on the box is $1.75.

Below is page 31 from the Lionel 1948 consumer showng the No. 93 water tower. Note the catalog price is indeed $1.75.

No. 64 Street Lamp & No. 93 Water Tank From Page 31 of the 1948 Lionel Consumer Catalog

I have a Lionel No. 193 Industrial Water Tower (manufactured from 1953-1955). This item, shown below, replicated water towers of small towns and industrial facilities. I read that it was possibly based on a water tower next to one of Lionel's plants. Mine has the red metal structure, that is the more common version. The rare version has a black-painted structure. The tank at the top has a lamp inside that blinks on and off. You can see the lamp on in the picture on the right.

Lionel No. 193 Industrial Water Tower



Lionel No. 58 Lamp Post

The picture above shows a Lionel No. 58 Lamp Post I have. This gooseneck lamp post is cream colored indicating it was produced afer 1940. It is 7 3/8 in. high. I have the pear-shaped frosted bulb for this lamp post and as you can see, the bulb and lamp post work. Note I have the original box (and hookup wire) for this lamp post.



I have two Lionel #71 Lamp Posts (manufactured from 1949-1959) and their original boxes. One is shown below.

No. 71 Lamp Post

The lamp post closely resembles lamp posts found in many cities throughout the United States in the 1940's. It features a gray metal post and an off-white globe. These lamp posts were inexpensive (mine has "95" handwritten on it) indicating it sold for 95 cents. The #71 Lamp Post is listed on page 33 of the 1952 catalog as shown below. Note the list price is indeed 95 cents.

No. 71 Lamp Post on Page 33 of 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

Because of the low price, this item sold well and is fairly common to locate today. I understand this lamp post is a simplified and cheaper version of the #35 Lamp Post. The globe on the #71 lamp post typically has hairline cracks and is discolored or faded. Mine has no cracks and does not appear to have much discoloration. The lamp post uses a bayonet-mount bulb and is prewired with no wire terminals.

I have 2 of these lamp posts. One is much older than the other as the insulation on the wires of the older one is cracking and the box is more tattered.

I have a No. 64 Highway Lamp Post shown below with one of the buildings I built, a Cararama O-scale die-cast metal and plastic Chevrolet 3100 pickup truck, and three railroad cars in the background. The scene represents an actual railroad building alongside a busy track.

No. 64 Highway Lamp Post

This greeen-painted metal lamp post was produced by Lionel from 1945-1949. It is 6 3/4 inches tall. It uses a special light bulb that is no longer manufactured, but you can buy a near-direct replacement. This accessory is highly sought after - especially if the bulb is good. The bulb in mine has an intermittant filament that will work sometimes at low voltage. Therefore, I do not light this lamp post, but it still looks good even if I do not light it. I have seen several of these without the bulb and they obviously do not look complete without the bulb. Note that I also have the original box for this accessory. As shown earlier in the picture of page 31 of the 1948 Lionel Consumer Catalog, the price of the No. 64 Highway Lamp Post (referred to as Street Lamp in the catalog) sold for $2.25 in 1948.

This is a Lionel #457 6-32991 radio station I have. It is an actual working digitally synthesized AM and FM radio. It runs on 12 - 18 Vac power. The red beacon on top of the tower blinks on and off when power is applied. The radio works well and is quite sensitive. This unit is new old stock and had never been taken out of the box when I received it. The radio is a 2000 vintage.


Lionel No. 214 Girder Bridge

The pictue above shows a Lionel No. 214 Girder Bridge (manufactured from 1953-1969). This bridge is 10 inches long and has unpainted black plastic sides and a metal base.

Lionel No. 260 Illuminated Bumper

The picture shows a Lionel No. 260 illuminated bumper (manufactured from 1951-1969). The bumber is made of metal, painted red, and has a spring-loaded black plastic shock absorber. It is illuminated by a 363 bayonet mount bulb below an RW-27 lens. I have 4 of these bumpers, two of which I have the original boxes as shown in the picture. I have the instructions for one of the bumpers.

Here is a metal sign I have. I think it was manufactured by Marx. It is in fairly good shape and reads "Caution High Speed Trains."


Homemade Buildings




The picture above shows some wood buildings I started building over 35 years ago. I never got around to finishing them then, but as seen earlier, I have finished two of them. In front of the larger building is a Lionel model 3462P milk car platform. Also shown on the far left is one of two railroad bridges I have. I also have numerous "Plasticville" figurines, lamp posts, utility poles, and other things to make a small village.

The picture below shows a closeup picture of the finished train station building. It is a small town train station with a bay window so people inside can look down the track and see the train coming. It is shown below with the General steam engine parked alongside. The building has a ticket window on the right, a door in the center, and a two-door combination on the left.




KW 190 Watt Transformer (1950-1965)



Trainmaster Type-KW Transformer

The picture above shows one of two transformers I have to run Lionel trains. The two transformers are identical and are called "Trainmaster" Type-KW (manufactured in 1950-1965). They have a power rating of 190 Watts. As shown, I have the original box for one of the transformers. On the top of the box the price of $22.50 is written in pencil. The Type-Kw transformer is listed on the back cover of the 1952 Lionel catalog along with 2 other transformers. The description of the Type-KW transformer from the catalog is shown below. Note the list price is $22.50.

Trainmaster Type-KW Transformer in 1952 Lionel Consumer Catalog

Each transformer is an autotransformer with a roller that rolls across the transformer windings to vary the voltage. Each has two controls to control 2 trains simultaneously with a direction control for each train. Thus with both transformers, I can control up to four trains. The transformers also have a horn and whistle controller, a circuit breaker, and some lower fixed voltage outputs for controlling accessories.


1033 90 Watt Transformer (1948-1956)



Lionel 1033 Transformer

The picture above shows a Lionel #1033 transformer I have. This transformer was included in many of Lionel's better 027 gauge outfits. The transformer has speed, whistle, and direction controls as well as two fixed voltage taps. Note that I have the original box for this transformer.

Below is a portion of page 32 of the 1948 Lionel Consumer Catalog showing the transformer. Note the transformer sold for $10.95 in 1948.

Lionel 1033 Transformer as shown on Page 32 of the 1948 Lionel Consumer Catalog




I also have a lot of Lionel "O"-gauge track sections (64 feet of straight sections and 42 arc feet of curved sections), 4 remote-controlled (by wire) #022 Lionel track switches, 3 #UCS remote-controlled (by wire) Lionel decoupling and unloading track sections, 1 #364C Lionel toggle switch, 1 very old #96C Lionel pushbutton switch, 2 Lionel "T" track crossing sections (#20 and #120), 2 Lionel trestle bridges, and 2 Lionel #260 track-end bumpers. I also have several Lionel power lock-ons, and several various Lionel contactors to operate the accessories.









Links to Suppliers of Train Parts and Accessories


Below are some links to suppliers of train repair parts, service manuals, new train products, and information on vintage Lionel trains.


Olsen's Toy Train Parts (OTTP) Train repair parts; on-line library of service manuals for most vintage Lionel products

Henning Scale Models New train products and some repair parts

Brasseur Electric Trains Train repair parts

Lionel Trains Library Information on most vintage Lionel engines, cars, and accessories




If you are interested in real trains, you should visit the North Carolina Transportation Museum in Spencer, NC. I have visited there and you can click here to see pictures I took of this interesting place.